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Fable listing

to the fables 51-100


Index
 
The Eagle and the Fox
The Eagle, the Jackdaw and the Shepherd
The Eagle and the Beetle
The Hawk and the Nightingale
The Athenian Debtor
The Goatherd And The Wild Goats
The Cat And The Birds
Aesop at the Shipyard
The Fox And The Goat
The Fox and the Lion
The Fisherman Piping
The Fox and the Leopard
The Fishermen
The Ape boasting to the Fox about his Ancestry
The Fox and the Grapes
The Cat And The Cock
The Fox Who Had Lost His Tail
The Fisherman and the Little Fish
The Fox and the Bramble
The Fox and the Crocodile
The Fishermen and the Tuna
The Fox and the Woodcutter
The Gamecocks and the Partridge
The Swollen Fox
The Halcyon
 
A Fisherman
The Fox and the Mask
The Cheater
The Charcoal-Burner And The Fuller
The Shipwrecked Man
The Man And His Two Sweethearts
The Manslayer
The Boasting Traveler
Impossible Promises
The Man and the Satyr
The Man and the Oracle
The Blind Man and the Whelp
The Ploughman and the Wolf
The Swallow and the other Birds
The Astronomer
The Fox, the Lamb and the Dog
The Farmer And His Sons
The Two Frogs
The Frogs Asking For a King
The Oxen And The Axle-Trees
The North Wind And The Sun
The Boy with the Stomach-Ache
The Nightingale and the Bat
The Herdsman And The Lost Bull
The Cat and Venus
 

The Eagle and the Fox

An Eagle and a Fox formed an intimate friendship and decided to live near each other. The Eagle built her nest in the branches of a tall tree, while the Fox crept into the underwood and there produced her young. Not long after they had agreed upon this plan, the Eagle, being in want of provision for her young ones, swooped down while the Fox was out, seized upon one of the little cubs, and feasted herself and her brood. The Fox on her return, discovered what had happened, but was less grieved for the death of her young than for her inability to avenge them. A just retribution, however, quickly fell upon the Eagle. While hovering near an altar, on which some villagers were sacrificing a goat, she suddenly seized a piece of the flesh, and carried it, along with a burning cinder, to her nest. A strong breeze soon fanned the spark into a flame, and the eaglets, as yet unfledged and helpless, were roasted in their nest and dropped down dead at the bottom of the tree. There, in the sight of the Eagle, the Fox gobbled them up.

The Eagle, the Jackdaw and the Shepherd

An Eagle, flying down from his perch on a lofty rock, seized upon a lamb and carried him aloft in his talons. A Jackdaw, who witnessed the capture of the lamb, was stirred with envy and determined to emulate the strength and flight of the Eagle. He flew around with a great whir of his wings and settled upon a large ram, with the intention of carrying him off, but his claws became entangled in the ram's fleece and he was not able to release himself, although he fluttered with his feathers as much as he could. The shepherd, seeing what had happened, ran up and caught him. He at once clipped the Jackdaw's wings, and taking him home at night, gave him to his children. On their saying, »Father, what kind of bird is it?« he replied, »To my certain knowledge he is a Daw; but he would like you to think an Eagle.«

The Eagle and the Beetle

As he was being chased by an Eagle, the hare ran to the dung Beetle, begging the Beetle to save him. The Beetle implored the Eagle to Respect the hare's asylum, solemnly compelling him by the sacred name of Zeus and pleading with the Eagle not to disregard him simply because of his small size. But the Eagle brushed the Beetle aside with a flick of his Wing and grabbed the hare, tearing him to pieces and devouring him.
The beetle was enraged and flew off together with the Eagle to find the Nest in which the Eagle kept his Eggs. After the Eagle was gone, the Beetle smashed all the Eggs. When the Eagle came back, he was dreadfully upset and looked for the Creature who had smashed the Eggs, intending to tear him to pieces. When it was time for the Eagle to Nest again, he put his Eggs in an even higher Place, but the Beetle flew all the way up to the Nest, smashed the Eggs, and went away.

The Eagle grieved for his little ones and said that this must be the result of some angry plot of Zeus to exterminate the Eagle race. When thenext Season came,
the Eagle did not feel secure keeping the Eggs in his Nest and instead went up to Olympus and placed the Eggs in Zeus's Lap. The Eagle said to Zeus, »Twice my Eggs have been destroyed; this Time, I am leaving them here under your protection.«
Whenthe Beetle found out what the Eagle had done, he stuffed himself with dung and went straight up to Zeus and flew right into his Face. At the sight of this filthy Creature, Zeus was startled and leaped to his feet, forgetting that he held the Eagle's Eggs inside his Lap. As a result, the Eggs were broken once again.
Zeus then learned of the wrong that had been done to the Beetle, and when the Eagle returned, Zeus said to him, »It is only right that you have lost your little ones,
since you mistreated the beetle!« The Beetle said, »The Eagle treated me badly,
but he also acted very impiously towards you, O Zeus! The Eagle did not fear to violate your sacred name, and he killed the one who had taken refuge with me.
I will not cease until I have punished the Eagle completely!«
Zeus did not want the race of Eagles to be wiped out, so he urged the Beetle to relent. When his efforts to persuade the Beetle failed, Zeus changed the breeding Season of the Eagles, so that it would take place at a Time when the Beetles were not found above Ground.

The Hawk and the Nightingale

A Nightingale, sitting aloft upon an oak and singing according to his wont, was seen by a Hawk who, being in need of food, swooped down and seized him. The Nightingale, about to lose his life, earnestly begged the Hawk to let him go, saying that he was not big enough to satisfy the hunger of a Hawk who, if he wanted food, ought to pursue the larger birds. The Hawk, interrupting him, said: »I should indeed have lost my senses if I should let go food ready in my hand, for the sake of pursuing birds which are not yet even within sight.«

The Athenian Debtor

In Athens, there was a man who had taken out a loan and was now being asked by the creditor to pay back the money. At first he asked the creditor to give him an extension, since he said he couldn't manage to find the cash. But he could not get the creditor to agree, so he brought the only pig that he had, a sow, and put it up for sale as the creditor was looking on. A buyer approached and asked if the sow was a good breeder. The man replied that she was indeed; in fact, her litters were miraculous:
for the Mysteries she gave birth only to female piglets, while for the Panathenaea Festival she gave birth only to males. When the buyer was dumbfounded by this story, the creditor added, »That's nothing! For the Festival of Dionysus, she gives birth to baby goats.«

The Goatherd and the wild Goats

A Goatherd, driving his flock from their pasture at eventide, found some Wild Goats mingled among them, and shut them up together with his own for the night. The next day it snowed very hard, so that he could not take the herd to their usual feeding places, but was obliged to keep them in the fold. He gave his own goats just sufficient food to keep them alive, but fed the strangers more abundantly in the hope of enticing them to stay with him and of making them his own. When the thaw set in, he led them all out to feed, and the Wild Goats scampered away as fast as they could to the mountains. The Goatherd scolded them for their ingratitude in leaving him, when during
the storm he had taken more care of them than of his own herd. One of them, turning about, said to him: »That is the very reason why we are so cautious; for if you yesterday treated us better than the Goats you have had so long, it is plain also that if others came after us, you would in the same manner prefer them to ourselves.«

The Cat and the Birds

A Cat, hearing that the Birds in a certain aviary were ailing dressed himself up as a physician, and, taking his cane and a bag of instruments becoming his profession, went to call on them. He knocked at the door and inquired of the inmates how they
all did, saying that if they were ill, he would be happy to prescribe for them and cure them. They replied, '»We are all very well, and shall continue so, if you will only be good enough to go away, and leave us as we are.«

Aesop at the Shipyard

Aesop the storyteller had nothing in particular to do, so he strolled into the workshop of some shipbuilders. The workers began to taunt Aesop, provoking him to speak,
so Aesop replied with this old story. »Once upon a time,« said Aesop, »there was only Chaos and Water. God then wanted to make a new element emerge, Gaia, the Earth. So he ordered the Earth to swallow the sea in three gulps. Earth did as she was ordered: the first gulp caused the mountains to appear, and the second gulp caused the plains to be revealed. And if she decides to take a third gulp,« said Aesop, »that will be the end of all you shipbuilders and your entire profession!«

The Fox and the Goat

A Fox one day fell into a deep well and could find no means of escape. A Goat, overcome with thirst, came to the same well, and seeing the Fox, inquired if the water was good. Concealing his sad plight under a merry guise, the Fox indulged in a lavish praise of the water, saying it was excellent beyond measure, and encouraging him to descend. The Goat, mindful only of his thirst, thoughtlessly jumped down, but just as he drank, the Fox informed him of the difficulty they were both in and suggested a scheme for their common escape. »If,« said he, »you will place your forefeet upon the wall and bend your head, I will run up your back and escape, and will help you out afterwards.« The Goat readily assented and the Fox leaped upon his back. Steadying himself with the Goat's horns, he safely reached the mouth of the well and made off as fast as he could. When the Goat upbraided him for breaking his promise, he turned around and cried out, »You foolish old fellow! If you had as many brains in your head as you have hairs in your beard, you would never have gone down before you had inspected the way up, nor have exposed yourself to dangers from which you had no means of escape.«

The Fox and the Lion


When a Fox who had never yet seen a Lion, fell in with him by chance for the first time in the forest, he was so frightened that he nearly died with fear. On meeting him for the second time, he was still much alarmed, but not to the same extent as at first. On seeing him the third time, he so increased in boldness that he went up to him and commenced afamiliar conversation with him.

The Fisherman Piping

A Fisherman skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore. Standing on
a projecting rock, he played several tunes in the hope that the fish, attracted by hismelody, would of their own accord dance into his net, which he had placed below. At last, having long waited in vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting his net into the sea, made an excellent haul of fish. When he saw them leaping about in the net upon the rock he said: »O you most perverse creatures, when I piped you would not dance, but now that I have ceased you do so merrily.«

The Fox and the Leopard


The Fox and the Leopard disputed which was the more beautiful of the two.
The Leopard exhibited one by one the various spots which decorated his skin. But the Fox, interrupting him, said, »And how much more beautiful than you am I, who am decorated, not in body, but in mind.«

The Fishermen

Some Fishermen were out trawling their nets. Perceiving them to be very heavy,
they danced about for joy and supposed that they had taken a large catch.
When they had dragged the nets to the shore they found but few fish: the nets were full of sand and stones, and the men were beyond measure cast down so much at the disappointment which had befallen them, but because they had formed such very different expectations. One of their company, an old man, said, »Let us cease lamenting, my mates, for, as it seems to me, sorrow is always the twin sister of joy; and it was only to be looked for that we, who just now were over-rejoiced, should next have something to make us sad.«

The Ape boasting to the Fox about his Ancestry

A Fox and a monkey were travelling along the same road. They passed through
a cemetery, and the monkey said to the fox, »All these dead people were the freedmen of my ancestors.« The Fox then said to the monkey, »This is an opportune moment for you to tell such lies: not a single one of the people entombed in this place can rise up and  refute what you say!«

The Fox and the Grapes







A famished Fox saw some clusters of ripe black grapes hanging from a trellised vine. She resorted to all her tricks to get at them, but wearied herself in vain, for she could not reach them. At last she turned away, hiding her disappointment and saying:
»The Grapes are sour, and not ripe as I thought.«





The Cat and the Cock

A Cat caught a Cock, and pondered how he might find a reasonable excuse for eating him. He accused him of being a nuisance to men by crowing in the nighttime and not permitting them to sleep. The Cock defended himself by saying that he did this for the benefit of men, that they might rise in time for their labors. The Cat replied, »Although you abound in specious apologies, I shall not remain supperless«; and he made a meal of him.

The Fox who had lost his Tail

A Fox caught in a trap escaped, but in so doing lost his tail. Thereafter, feeling his life a burden. From the shame and ridicule to which he was exposed, he schemed to convince all the other Foxes that being tailless was much more attractive, thus making up for his own deprivation. He assembled a good many Foxes and publicly advised them to cut off their tails, saying that they would not only look much better without them, but that they would get rid of the weight of the brush, which was a very great inconvenience. One of them interrupting him said, »If you had not yourself lost your tail, my friend, you would not thus counsel us.«

The Fisherman and the little Fish

A Fisherman who lived on the produce of his nets, one day caught a single small Fish as the result of his day's labor. The Fish, panting convulsively, thus entreated for his life: »O Sir, what good can I be to you, and how little am I worth? I am not yet come to my full size. Pray spare my life, and put me back into the sea. I shall soon become
a large fish fit for the tables of the rich, and then you can catch me again, and make a handsome profit of me.« The Fisherman replied, »I should indeed be a very simple fellow if, for the chance of a greater uncertain profit, I were to forego my present certain gain.«

The Fox and the Bramble

A Fox was mounting a hedge when he lost his footing and caught hold of a Bramble to save himself. Having pricked and grievously tom the soles of his feet, he accused the Bramble because, when he had fled to her for assistance, she had used him worse than the hedge itself. The Bramble, interrupting him, said, »But you really must have been out of your senses to fasten yourself on me, who am myself always accustomed to fasten upon others.«

The Fox and the Crocodile

The fox and the crocodile were disputing about their pedigrees. The crocodile was proudly enumerating the eminent qualities of his ancestors, and when he said that they had been the highest ranking athletic officials, the fox remarked, »My dear Sir, even if you had not mentioned it, the mere condition of your skin is evidence enough that you have suffered long years of athletic sports out of doors in the sun!«

The Fishermen and the Tuna

Some Fishermen had gone out fishing, and when they had struggled for a long time but had not managed to catch anything, they became very downcast and prepared to turn back. All of a sudden a tuna who was being chased by some bigger fish leaped into their boat. The men seized the tuna and went home rejoicing.

The Fox and the Woodcutter

A Fox, running before the hounds, came across a Woodcutter felling an oak and begged him to show him a safe hiding-place. The Woodcutter advised him to take shelter in his own hut, so the Fox crept in and hid himself in a corner. The huntsman soon came up with his hounds and inquired of the Woodcutter if he had seen the Fox. He declared that he had not seen him, and yet pointed, all the time he was speaking, to the hut where the Fox lay hidden. The huntsman took no notice of the signs, but believing his word, hastened forward in the chase. As soon as they were well away, the Fox departed without taking any notice of the Woodcutter: whereon he called to him and reproached him, saying, »You ungrateful fellow, you owe your life to me, and yet you leave me without a word of thanks.« The Fox replied, »Indeed, I should have thanked you fervently if your deeds had been as good as your words, and if your hands had not been traitors to your speech.«

The Gamecocks and the Partridge

A Man had two Gamecocks in his poultry-yard. One day by chance he found a tame Partridge for sale. He purchased it and brought it home to be reared with his Gamecocks. When the Partridge was put into the poultry-yard, they struck at it and followed it about, so that the Partridge became grievously troubled and supposed that he was thus evilly treated because he was a stranger. Not long afterwards he saw the Cocks fighting together and not separating before one had well beaten the other.
He then said to himself, »I shall no longer distress myself at being struck at by these Gamecocks, when I see that they cannot even refrain from quarreling with each other.«

The Swollen Fox

A very hungry Fox, seeing some bread and meat left by shepherds in the hollow of an oak, crept into the hole and made a hearty meal. When he finished, he was so full that he was not able to get out, and began to groan and lament his fate. Another Fox passing by heard his cries, and coming up, inquired the cause of his complaining.
On learning what had happened, he said to him, »Ah, you will have to remain there,
my friend, until you become such as you were when you crept in, and then you will easily get out.«

The Halcyon

The Halcyon is a bird who is fond of deserted places and who always lives on the sea They say that she makes her nest on the rocky cliffs of the coast in order to protect herself from human hunters. So when a certain halcyon was about to lay her eggs,
she went to a promontory and found a rock jutting out towards the sea and decided to make her nest there. But when she went to look for food, it happened that the sea swelled under the blustering wind and reached as high as the halcyon's home and flooded the nest, killing her chicks. When the halcyon returned and saw what had happened, she said, »What a fool I was to have protected myself against a plot hatched on the land by taking refuge here on the sea, when it is the sea that has utterly betrayed me!«

A Fisherman

A Fisherman was fishing in a river. He stretched out his nets and covered the river's stream from one side to the other. He then tied a stone to a piece of rope and struck the water with it so that the fish would flee and fall unwittingly into the net. Someone who lived in that neighbourhood saw what the man was doing and began to complain, because by agitating the water in this way he deprived them of clear water to drink. The fisherman answered, »But if I do not disturb the river, I will have no choice but to die of hunger!«

The Fox and the Mask

A Fox entered the house of an actor and, rummaging through all his properties,
came upon a Mask, an admirable imitation of a human head. He placed his paws on it and said, »What a beautiful head! Yet it is of no value, as it entirely lacks brains.«

The Cheater

A poor man had fallen sick, so he prayed to the gods and vowed »If I recover my health, I will sacrifice a hundred oxen in your honour.« The gods wanted to test whether the man was telling the truth, so they granted his prayer and the man recovered from his sickness. When the man was well again, he did not have any oxen that he could sacrifice, so he made a hundred oxen out of dough and burned them on the altar, saying, »O supernatural beings, behold, I have fulfilled my vow.« The gods wanted to pay him back for having tricked them, so they stood at the head of his bed in a dream and said, »Go to the beach, such a place, and you will find there a hundred
talents of gold.« The man woke up, filled with joy, and went running down to the designated
place to look for the gold. When he got there, he fell into the hands of pirates and was taken captive. The man pleaded with the pirates and said, »Just let me go and
I will give you a thousand talents of gold!«

The Charcoal-Burner and the Fuller

A Charcoal-Burner carried on his trade in his own house. One day he met a friend,
a Fuller, and entreated him to come and live with him, saying that they should be far better neighbors and that their housekeeping expenses would be lessened. The Fuller replied: »The arrangement is impossible as far as I am concerned, for whatever
I should whiten, you would immediately blacken again with your charcoal.«

The Shipwrecked Man

A wealthy Athenian was making a sea voyage with some companions. A terrible storm blew up and the ship capsized. All the other passengers started to swim, but the Athenian kept praying to Athena, making all kinds of promises if only she would save him. Then one of the other shipwrecked passengers swam past him and said, »While you pray to Athena, start moving your arms!«

The Man and his two Sweethearts

A middle-aged Man, whose hair had begun to turn gray, courted two women at the same time. One of them was young, and the other well advanced in years. The elder woman, ashamed to be courted by a man younger than herself, made a point, whenever her admirer visited her, to pull out some portion of his black hairs.
The younger, on the contrary, not wishing to become the wife of an old man,
was equally zealous in removing every gray hair she could find. Thus it came to pass that between them both he very soon found that he had not a hair left on his head.

The Manslayer

A Man committed a murder, and was pursued by the relations of the man whom he murdered. On his reaching the river Nile he saw a Lion on its bank and being fearfully afraid, climbed up a tree. He found a serpent in the upper branches of the tree, and again being greatly alarmed, he threw himself into the river, where a crocodile caught him and ate him. Thus the earth, the air, and the water alike refused shelter to a murderer.

The Boasting Traveler

A Man who had traveled in foreign lands boasted very much, on returning to his own country, of the many wonderful and heroic feats he had performed in the different places he had visited. Among other things, he said that when he was at Rhodes he had leaped to such a distance that no man of his day could leap anywhere near him as to that, there were in Rhodes many persons who saw him do it and whom he could call as witnesses. One of the bystanders interrupted him, saying: »Now, my good man,
if this be all true there is no need of witnesses. Suppose this to be Rhodes, and leap for us.«

Impossible Promises

A poor man had taken ill and was in very bad shape. When the doctors had given up hope, since he didn't have anything he could pay with, the man called upon the gods and vowed »O you great and radiant divinities, if you restore my health, I will bring a hundred oxen to you as a sacrifice.« His wife then asked him, »Where are you going to get a hundred oxen from, if you get well?« The man said to her, »And do you suppose I am going to ever get out of this bed so that the gods will be able to demand payment?«

The Man and the Satyr

A Man and a Satyr once drank together in token of a bond of alliance being formed between them. One very cold wintry day, as they talked, the Man put his fingers to his mouth and blew on them. When the Satyr asked the reason for this, he told him that he did it to warm his hands because they were so cold. Later on in the day they sat down to eat, and the food prepared was quite scalding. The Man raised one of the dishes a little towards his mouth and blew in it. When the Satyr again inquired the reason, he said that he did it to cool the meat, which was too hot. »I can no longer consider you as a friend,« said the Satyr, »a fellow who with the same breath blows hot and cold.«

The Man and the Oracle

A wicked Man had gone to visit Apollo in Delphi, wanting to test the god. He took
a sparrow in one hand, concealing it with his cloak, and then stood by the oracle and inquired of the god, »Apollo, the thing that I am carrying in my hand: is it living, or is it dead?« The man planned to show the sparrow alive if the god said 'dead,' and if the god said 'living,' he would strangle the sparrow immediately and present the dead bird. But the god recognized the man's evil purpose, and said, »Listen, do whatever you want: it is entirely up to you whether you will show me something living or dead!«

The Blind Man and the Whelp

A Blind Man was accustomed to distinguishing different animals by touching them with his hands. The whelp of a Wolf was brought him, with a request that he would feel it, and say what it was. He felt it, and being in doubt, said: »I do not quite know whether it is the cub of a Fox, or the whelp of a Wolf, but this I know full well. It would not be safe to admit him to the sheepfold.«

The Ploughman and the Wolf

A Plowman loosed his oxen from the yoke and led them away to be watered. Meanwhile, a hungry wolf, who was looking for something to eat, discovered the plow and started to lick the yoke straps where the oxen had been tied. The unsuspecting wolf slowly but surely slipped his neck beneath the yoke, until he was not able to pull it back out. He then started dragging the plow along the furrow. When the plowman came back and saw what had happened, he said, »O you wicked creature, if only you would give up your life of theft and crime in order to devote yourself entirely to farming!«

The Swallow and the other Birds

Some Birds who had flocked together saw a man sowing flax seed but they thought nothing of it. The swallow, however, understood what this meant. She called an assembly of the birds and explained that this was an altogether dangerous situation, but the other birds just laughed at her. When the flax seed sprouted, the swallow warned the birds again, »This is something dangerous; let's go and pull it up. If it is allowed to grow, people will make it into nets and we will not able to escape the traps that they devise.« The birds mocked the swallow's words and scorned her advice.
So the swallow went to the people and began to make her nest only under the roofs of their houses. Meanwhile, the other birds refused to heed the swallow's warnings,
so now they are constantly being trapped in nets and snares.

The Astronomer

An Astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening,
as he wandered through the suburbs with his whole attention fixed on the sky,
he fell accidentally into a deep well. While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: »Hark ye, old fellow, why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven,
do you not manage to see what is on earth?«

The Fox, the Lamb and the Dog

A Fox entered a flock of sheep, seized one of the suckling lambs and pretended to kiss it. A dog asked the fox what she was doing. »I'm hugging and playing with the lamb,« said the fox. The dog replied, »Well, you better let go of that lamb, or I'll play the dogs' game with you!«

The Farmer and his Sons

A Father, being on the point of death, wished to be sure that his sons would give the same attention to his farm as he himself had given it. He called them to his bedside and said, »My sons, there is a great treasure hid in one of my vineyards.« The sons, after his death, took their spades and mattocks and carefully dug over every portion of their land. They found no treasure, but the vines repaid their labor by an extraordinary and superabundant crop.

The two Frogs

To Frogs dwelt in the same pool. When the pool dried up under the summer's heat, they left it and set out together for another home. As they went along they chanced to pass a deep well, amply supplied with water, and when they saw it, one of the Frogs said to the other, »Let us descend and make our abode in this well: it will furnish us with shelter and food.« The other replied with greater caution, »But suppose the water should fail us. How can we get out again from so great a depth?«

The Frogs asking for a King

The Frogs, grieved at having no established Ruler, sent ambassadors to Jupiter entreating for a King. Perceiving their simplicity, he cast down a huge log into the lake. The Frogs were terrified at the splash occasioned by its fall and hid themselves in the depths of the pool. But as soon as they realized that the huge log was motionless, they swam again to the top of the water, dismissed their fears, climbed up, and began squatting on it in contempt. After some time they began to think themselves ill-treated in the appointment of so inert a Ruler, and sent a second deputation to Jupiter to pray that he would set over them another sovereign. He then gave them an Eel to govern them. When the Frogs discovered his easy good nature, they sent yet a third time to Jupiter to beg him to choose for them still another King. Jupiter, displeased with all their complaints, sent a Heron, who preyed upon the Frogs day by day till there were none left to croak upon the lake.

The Oxen and the Axle-Trees

A heavy Wagon was being dragged along a country lane by a team of Oxen.
The Axle-Trees groaned and creaked terribly; whereupon the Oxen, turning round, thus addressed the wheels: »Hullo there! Why do you make so much noise? We bear all the labor, and we, not you, ought to cry out.«

The North Wind and the Sun

The North Wind and the Sun disputed as to which was the most powerful, and agreed that he should be declared the victor who could first strip a wayfaring man of his clothes. The North Wind first tried his power and blew with all his might, but the keener his blasts, the closer the Traveler wrapped his cloak around him, until at last, resigning all hope of victory, the Wind called upon the Sun to see what he could do. The Sun suddenly shone out with all his warmth. The Traveler no sooner felt his genial rays than he took off one garment after another, and at last, fairly overcome with heat, undressed and bathed in a stream that lay in his path. Persuasion is better than Force.

The Boy with the Stomach-Ache

A crowd of country folk had sacrificed a bull to the goddess Demeter, scattering leaves over the wide threshing-floor, while the tables were covered with platters
of meat and jars brimming with wine. There was a boy who ate greedily and stuffed himself full with beef tripe. On the way home, he was seized by a stomach ache. Collapsing into his mother's tender embrace, he vomited, and said, »Woe is me,
I'm going to die! Mother, all my guts are falling out!« The mother replied, »Be brave and throw it all up; don't hold anything back. Those are not your own guts you are vomiting: they are the bull's!«

The Nightingale and the Bat

A Nightingale was hanging in a cage in a window. A bat flew up and asked the nightingale why she sang at night but was silent during the day. The nightingale said that she had her reasons: it was while she had been singing once during the day that she had been captured. This had taught her a lesson, and she had vowed that she would sing only at night. The bat remarked, »But there is no need for that now,
when it won't do you any good: you should have been on your guard before you were captured!«

The Herdsman and the lost Bull

A Herdsman tending his flock in a forest lost a Bull-calf from the fold. After a long and fruitless search, he made a vow that, if he could only discover the thief who had stolen the Calf, he would offer a lamb in sacrifice to Hermes, Pan, and the Guardian Deities ofthe forest. Not long afterwards, as he ascended a small hillock, he saw at its foot a Lion feeding on the Calf. Terrified at the sight, he lifted his eyes and his hands to heaven, and said: »Just now I vowed to offer a lamb to the Guardian Deities of the forest if I could only find out who had robbed me; but now that I have discovered ththief, I would willingly add a full-grown Bull to the Calf I have lost, if I may only secure my own escape from him in safety.«

The Cat and Venus

A Cat fell in love with a handsome young man, and entreated Venus to change her into the form of a woman. Venus consented to her request and transformed her into
a beautiful damsel, so that the youth saw her and loved her, and took her home as hi bride. While the two were reclining in their chamber, Venus wishing to discover if the Cat in her change of shape had also altered her habits of life, let down a mouse in the middle of the room. The Cat, quite forgetting her present condition, started up from the couch and pursued the mouse, wishing to eat it. Venus was much disappointed and again caused her to return to her former shape.